Category Archives: Schoolwork

US History Wk 4

Philadelphia Convention: Virginia’s Proposition (Pt. 2/2)

  • Congressional veto of state laws
  • voted down repeatedly
  • Madison kept bring it up
  • Madison thought new gov would fail in a few years since they didn’t adopt his possibilities
  • commerce and slavery were also issues:
  • federalists called for empowering central gov to tax people through tariff
  • import tax would be easiest tax to administer
  • people from New England were fond of the notion
  • George Mason of Virginia objected
  • Continue reading

Geography of Religion Wk 4

The Hindu Way of Life

According to the Vedas, life began as a great cosmic sacrifice. The sacrifice of the creator god Purusha created the world as we know it. His eye: the sun. His mind: the moon. And so forth. According to Holy Scripture, humans are born into one of four classes, each represented by some part of Purusha. The highest class (varna) is the Brahmans or priests and came from the creator god’s mouth. The next highest is the Kshatriyas, those men born to be warriors or nobility, and were created from his arms. The third class is the most populated and made up of farmers, merchants, and craftsmen and were crafted from his thighs. The last came from his feet; the Sudra, slaves and serfs. Women’s role in this group tended to assume the status of their husbands or fathers. Continue reading

CWP Wk 4

Can the Government Keep Us Safe?

The second amendment states that, “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” This means that all US citizens have the right to own guns. This is one of the rights that we possess as humans, whether or not a government exists. Some people (those who vote to increase gun restrictions) are under the impression that the government will be able to keep us completely safe and it completely justified in removing our rights in order to do so.

Are they right? Continue reading

US History Wk 3

Philadelphia Convention: Virginia’s Proposition (Pt. 1/2)

The Philadelphia Convention was held May-Sept. 1787, where delegates from each state of the U.S. drafted our current federal constitution. The First thing the convention did was to elect George Washington as president of the convention. The second thing they did was to kick out the reporters and swear all of the people present to secrecy until the convention was adjourned. The third thing that happened was Governor Randolph presenting his proposal in front of the entire convention. Prior to the Convention’s start, the experienced James Madison had gathered together some like-minded delegates so they could form a proposition that would be presented to the Convention at the start of the meeting, therefore forcing the delegates to spend most of their time discussing the said proposal. The Articles of Confederation were based on a federal government model (one government to serve the parts) as opposed to a national model (many parts to serve the whole). The plan that Gov. Randolph presented was to form a new constitution that would be amendable without congresses permission. The central government would be allowed to admit new states without asking for old states permission. The Government could tax itself without asking for the state’s permission first. There would also be a national legislative branch, a national judicial branch, and an executive branch. The new constitution would hand a lot of power to the new central government and was objected to immediately by many less-populated states because they would posses much less power than more populated states. Tune in next week to see what the Philadelphia Convention decides.

CWP Wk 3

Are Markets Sexist?

First, we’re gonna talk about the gender-wage-gap, probably the most common example of sexism. All you have to do is look at how this “evidence” was collected to see that this is not in fact true. The numbers were calculated using median wages of men and women as a whole, with no categories for different professions. Of course we must also factor in that different careers and life choices appeal to men vs. women, so naturally one gender is bound to earn a higher wage than the other. Continue reading

Geography of Religion Wk 3

Hinduism’s Holy Books

The Vedas–Ancient Holy books of the Hindus–reveal eternal truths and wisdom, and are believed to have existed eternally. (They date back to 1200 B.C.) Altogether there are 4 Vedas. 2 are collections of laudatory hymns ( Rig Veda and Sama Veda) while one is a manual for performing rituals (Yajur Veda) and one is filled with prayers and charms for health and fortune (Atharva Veda.) Several deities are recognized, such as Varuna, Indra, Rudra, Vishnu, and Agni. The gods and goddesses of the Vedic universe are associated with specific aspects of the natural world, such as the rivers of India, which are all represented by a different goddess. Offerings to these gods and goddesses of things such as plants and sacrificed animals, are burned by Vedic priests according to precise instructions in the Yajur Veda in return for “peacetime harvests and wartime victories.” Continue reading

Geography of Religion Wk 1&2

ORIGINS

Humans have always known there was a force greater than them in the universe since the beginning of time. We respond to this knowledge by worship, attempts to gain understanding, or the realization that we cannot in fact truly understand. Dreams have always brought us closer to our beliefs and inspire us to ask some of the oldest questions: Who am I? Why am I here? Every culture has a different answer. There are other unanswerable questions as well. Humans have always seen the power of the ocean or a storm or the birth of a human and wondered “if something was powerful enough to create all of this, is there some way for me to also control this much power?” The idea of a higher being has also been used to enforce laws and ways of living together in harmony since the very beginning of civilization. Punishment or rewards after death for living a certain lifestyle are a powerful motivator in all cultures to obey the rules and stay in line. Evidence shows that even people as ancient as the Neanderthals may have placed special items in the graves of their loved ones to accompany them to the afterlife. While there will never be a way to prove or disprove the existence of any God(s) there is no denying that ancient civilizations have depended on their beliefs to grow and prosper, and without the confidence that there is someone higher up than us, we would not be where we are in the world today.

GODS IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD

Continue reading

CWP Wk 2

“How Much Policing Do We Really Need?”

Why have confrontations between the police and the common citizen become so lethal? Racism, poor training, or availability of firearms to civilians? Well it’s really none of these in the long run. Without profit and loss in the policing industry, the police cannot know if they are using their resources effectively. Since the people are not there to tell police what problems they need to be dealt with the most, bureaucrats and politicians step in and tell the police “what the people want or need.”

Economist Bruce Benson (Florida) found that when police focus on enforcing the abolition of drugs, they turn their attention away from defending the people and their property, and crime in those areas shoots up.

Turning again to the economic side of the equation, we can see that because the police are not using the free market system to get paid, they simply can’t tell which is greater; the value of their services, or the resources used up to

What about police immunity in court? Some people argue in favor that when cops are not held to the same laws as the rest of us, they will not hesitate to use the force they need to in order to properly perform their jobs. I think that this simply encourages police to use excessive force instead, making the problem even worse.

Since police do not use the free market system and therefore have no obligation to satisfy the consumer, we should not be surprised when they act in their or the state’s best interests instead of the people’s interests who it is their job to protect and serve. Continue reading

US History Wk 2

(They only said I had to write a paper, not that it had to be good)

After the Boston Tea Party, parliament decided to adopt a suit of acts called the Coercive Acts in 1774. One of the Coercive Acts stated that the upper house would now be selected by a king-appointed governor instead of the people as had been done previously.  Another of the acts closed port of Boston. Yet another act allowed soldiers to freely grab private residences to live in. The ultimate conflict resulted from american resistance to these acts.

April 19, 1775, a party of British solders went up to Concord to arrest Samuel Adams and John Hancock but Paul Revere had already warned people. Stuff happened. After the conflict where several Americans were killed, the British were forced to retreat to Boston.

About a month later, the second Continental Congress was called where alliances were formed, George Washington was named commander and chief of a force of common citizens, and a point decimal system was established for money to replace the confusing and complicated British system. 8 grains of sliver totaled a dollar which explains why a quarter is sometimes called a 2 bit piece.

August 1775, King George issued a royal proclamation that said something along the lines of, “anyone who resists parliamentary policy in North America was in rebellion and must be brought to justice.” The Colonials hoped in vain that their parliamentary allies may win the argument in favor of fairness for the colonies. Finally on July 4 1776 the colonies abandoned that sinking ship and declared independence. By 1783 the fighting had completely ceased.

US History Wk 1

We can clearly see that the South had a very different culture from the North in Colonial times. The Cavalier, Celtic, and South African cultures dominated in the South while the Puritans and Quakers resided primarily in the North. Today, we’re gonna talk a bit about Cavalier culture. Land and status were everything in cavalier society. Their ultimate goal in North America was to re-create the aristocratic style that they had in England. The famous southern accent was actually the people hanging onto the old English language. In fact, Shakespeare probably would’ve had a southern accent, NOT the Elizabethan accent we all imagine him having. Marriage between the Cavaliers was strictly orthodox christian.  The standard age for marriage was anywhere from 18-20  for girls and 25-30 for boys. There was a heavy emphasis on keeping wealth and land in the family, which resulted in a lot of intermarriage. Cavalier society was extremely male dominated. Girls weren’t allowed to do much but also were not expected to do much. Guys on the other hand had to really step their game up, learn how to effectively run a household, do their part in society, be skilled in all things manly, and yet still be a gentleman at the same time with refined dancing skills and manners. In Southern society, you went to church because you were absolutely devoted to it. Mass consisted of a few very short lectures and an after service feast. Speaking of feasting, the Cavilers had great food; fresh veggies and fruits and lots of beef. Everything was fried and flavored subtly but with lots of spices.