Category Archives: US History

US History Wk 4

Philadelphia Convention: Virginia’s Proposition (Pt. 2/2)

  • Congressional veto of state laws
  • voted down repeatedly
  • Madison kept bring it up
  • Madison thought new gov would fail in a few years since they didn’t adopt his possibilities
  • commerce and slavery were also issues:
  • federalists called for empowering central gov to tax people through tariff
  • import tax would be easiest tax to administer
  • people from New England were fond of the notion
  • George Mason of Virginia objected
  • Continue reading

US History Wk 3

Philadelphia Convention: Virginia’s Proposition (Pt. 1/2)

The Philadelphia Convention was held May-Sept. 1787, where delegates from each state of the U.S. drafted our current federal constitution. The First thing the convention did was to elect George Washington as president of the convention. The second thing they did was to kick out the reporters and swear all of the people present to secrecy until the convention was adjourned. The third thing that happened was Governor Randolph presenting his proposal in front of the entire convention. Prior to the Convention’s start, the experienced James Madison had gathered together some like-minded delegates so they could form a proposition that would be presented to the Convention at the start of the meeting, therefore forcing the delegates to spend most of their time discussing the said proposal. The Articles of Confederation were based on a federal government model (one government to serve the parts) as opposed to a national model (many parts to serve the whole). The plan that Gov. Randolph presented was to form a new constitution that would be amendable without congresses permission. The central government would be allowed to admit new states without asking for old states permission. The Government could tax itself without asking for the state’s permission first. There would also be a national legislative branch, a national judicial branch, and an executive branch. The new constitution would hand a lot of power to the new central government and was objected to immediately by many less-populated states because they would posses much less power than more populated states. Tune in next week to see what the Philadelphia Convention decides.

US History Wk 2

(They only said I had to write a paper, not that it had to be good)

After the Boston Tea Party, parliament decided to adopt a suit of acts called the Coercive Acts in 1774. One of the Coercive Acts stated that the upper house would now be selected by a king-appointed governor instead of the people as had been done previously.  Another of the acts closed port of Boston. Yet another act allowed soldiers to freely grab private residences to live in. The ultimate conflict resulted from american resistance to these acts.

April 19, 1775, a party of British solders went up to Concord to arrest Samuel Adams and John Hancock but Paul Revere had already warned people. Stuff happened. After the conflict where several Americans were killed, the British were forced to retreat to Boston.

About a month later, the second Continental Congress was called where alliances were formed, George Washington was named commander and chief of a force of common citizens, and a point decimal system was established for money to replace the confusing and complicated British system. 8 grains of sliver totaled a dollar which explains why a quarter is sometimes called a 2 bit piece.

August 1775, King George issued a royal proclamation that said something along the lines of, “anyone who resists parliamentary policy in North America was in rebellion and must be brought to justice.” The Colonials hoped in vain that their parliamentary allies may win the argument in favor of fairness for the colonies. Finally on July 4 1776 the colonies abandoned that sinking ship and declared independence. By 1783 the fighting had completely ceased.

US History Wk 1

We can clearly see that the South had a very different culture from the North in Colonial times. The Cavalier, Celtic, and South African cultures dominated in the South while the Puritans and Quakers resided primarily in the North. Today, we’re gonna talk a bit about Cavalier culture. Land and status were everything in cavalier society. Their ultimate goal in North America was to re-create the aristocratic style that they had in England. The famous southern accent was actually the people hanging onto the old English language. In fact, Shakespeare probably would’ve had a southern accent, NOT the Elizabethan accent we all imagine him having. Marriage between the Cavaliers was strictly orthodox christian.  The standard age for marriage was anywhere from 18-20  for girls and 25-30 for boys. There was a heavy emphasis on keeping wealth and land in the family, which resulted in a lot of intermarriage. Cavalier society was extremely male dominated. Girls weren’t allowed to do much but also were not expected to do much. Guys on the other hand had to really step their game up, learn how to effectively run a household, do their part in society, be skilled in all things manly, and yet still be a gentleman at the same time with refined dancing skills and manners. In Southern society, you went to church because you were absolutely devoted to it. Mass consisted of a few very short lectures and an after service feast. Speaking of feasting, the Cavilers had great food; fresh veggies and fruits and lots of beef. Everything was fried and flavored subtly but with lots of spices.