Monthly Archives: February 2017

West Civ^2 Blogging (L105)

(1) What were the key steps in the process of Italian unification?

Up until the 19th century, Italy consisted of a series of independent states. Of all the states involved in the unification of Italy, Piedmont was the most influential. Two prominent statesmen, Giuseppe Mazzini and Giuseppe Garibaldi, had been attempting to unify Italy for a long time, but the Prime Minister of Piedmont, Count Camillo di Cavour, played the biggest role during the 1850s. During the Crimean war, he sent 15,000 troops to anti-Russian side in an effort to gain France as an ally when time came to oust the Austrian overlords of Italy. Napoleon III supported Cavour with the condition that they would only fight as long as Austria would fire the first shot. After many failed attempts to provoke Austria into attacking, Napoleon finally gave up and began to demobilize his army. Viewing the retreating French army as an easy target to finally be rid of once and for all, Austria finally lashed out. But, the French armies were victorious and Lombardy was added to the new unified states that made up Italy at that time. However, the unification of Italy was not yet complete! Garibaldi the famous general, entered the scene again and conquered the southern part of Italy, including various Vatican territories, for Piedmont, who was ruling over the states forming Italy. In 1861 Cavour died, never seeing the full unification of Italy to which he had devoted his life. Nevertheless, one by one, more states were conquered, with the exception of the Vatican which remained independent, forming the Italy of today in 1870. Continue reading

Graphic Novel <3

I’m designing a graphic novel series (It would be SO cool if I could publish it!) and these are some character concepts for the prequel story. (Yes, I have to make everything harder than it already is–because a normal graphic novel series isn’t enough work :( ) The Prequel will be set somewhere from 1933-1950s America and focused on witches and the pagan religion as interpreted per my research. Basically think “urban witches throughout history” and “Celtic gods” if you still don’t get what the story will be about. The prequel has only 2 main characters as opposed to the 3-4 in the main series and one of them is in the character ref sheet below. The other image is me trying to figure out how to represent the Great Mother (Also called the “Goddess.” Look it up.) because dang it there are way too many possibilities! Should I go really traditional Viking or more Greek or Egyptian sky goddess? Help an artist out and give me opinions! (Criteria via internet: a moon goddess and mother nature blend.)

Bel The Great Mother concept doodles

 

West Civ^2 Blogging (LESSON 100!!)

(1) Discuss two weak points in the views of Karl Marx, and explain what’s wrong with them.

  • The first belief of Karl Marx that does not hold up under close inspection is  that if the division of labor is removed, out would pour artistic talent and skill into the world. But why would you attempt to specialize in perhaps 20 fields when you could work in 19 of them as hobbies and be exceptional at one in particular? If everyone decided that they wanted to focus on multiple jobs instead of one, quality health care for example would vanish. No one would specialize in the medical field anymore and the death rate would shoot back to the middle ages. Aren’t we all fond of comfy couches to lounge on in our spare time? They would vanish as well. With no one dedicated to providing a quality couch, every one you bought would be so lacking in quality and durability that it would be a waste of money to even own a couch anymore. Without specialists in every field that you can think of, quality products and care would cease to exist (especially in industries such as plumbing.)
  • The second paper-thin belief of Karl Marx is that all exchanged items must be equal. This is utterly and absurdly false because the entire reason people exchange objects is because they are unequal. For instance let’s say Fred has a new pen and Jane has a toy car and they would like to exchange the two items. If the items were equal. both people would be satisfied with what they have and not want what the other has instead. Fred desires the toy car more than he likes his pen and vice versa with Jane, making the two items unequal in both of their eyes and leaving both satisfied after the exchange. This simple example can be applied to any two exchanged items and completely trashes Marx’s belief.

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West Civ^2 Blogging (L95)

(1) What happened in France during the Revolution of 1830?

The 1820’s in France was a fairly prosperous time. However, as it came to an end, people began to complain about their many grievances that had been easily placated with the comfortable living of the 1820’s. Rioters and Political protesters filled the streets. Charles X, the new king, clamped down on the already restricted free press and reduced the limit of those allowed to vote to only 23,000 citizens. The Ultras (supporters of the king) attempted to portray those against the king as the descendants of the Reign of Terror. Animosity only grew as a result. Charles X dismissed the Chamber of Deputies (the main legislative body of France.) Eventually, Charles was deposed and replaced by a more moderate, middle-class-minded type of king. Meanwhile artisans were breaking machines and demanding that the government shut down labor saving machinery (idiots) because this newfangled machinery was taking their jobs away. Louis Philippe–the new king–was not sympathetic to their plight and demanded that the riots halt. The 1820’s clashed sharply with the 1830’s and if the Revolutions of 1830 told me anything, it is that the absence of a comfortable life in the wake of prosperity can stir up people quicker than anything else. Continue reading